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Tuesday, October 31, 2006

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Dobyns-Bennett Band wins Tennessee Governor's Cup

See photos at www.dbband.org

 

For the past five months, one can hardly drive past the intersection of Eastman Road & Center Street without witnessing the exhaustive practice sessions of the Dobyns-Bennett Band and witness the parental support system in action.  The hard work paid off!  This is the first time an East Tennessee school has won the prestigious award.

 

For the first time in the school’s history, Dobyns-Bennett High School Marching Band was named the Grand Champions of the 2006 Contest of Champions competition held in Murfreesboro, TN on October 28.

 

The event, hosted by Middle Tennessee State University, is considered the premier invitational marching band competition in Tennessee. More than 21 bands competed for the coveted Grand Champion Governor’s Cup, considered the highest honor a Tennessee marching band can receive

 

The Dobyns-Bennett High School Marching Band includes more than 380 members and is the largest marching band in the state of Tennessee. The Band is directed by Lafe Cook, with assistant directors Ryan Gilbert and Jason Walsh.  Phil Ledford is the Color Guard director.  Their competitive show entitled, Symphonies of Gaia, is based on a new work written for concert band and was adapted by Gilbert for marching band. The percussion music was arranged by Walsh.  Ledford choreographed the Color Guard.

 

Dobyns-Bennett High School’s Band was also recently named as a 2006 Grammy Signature School by the Grammy Foundation, and was awarded the Sudler Flag of Honor by the John Phillips Sousa Foundation in December 2005.  The Sudler Flag of Honor is the highest international honor a band can receive.  The Dobyns-Bennett Band is the first and only band in the State of Tennessee to receive this prestigious award.

 

For more information on the Dobyns-Bennett High School Band, contact Director Lafe Cook at (423) 378-8400.

-KCS-

 

Monday, October 30, 2006

Kingsport Pavilion grading permit issued

In case you haven’t been by the site lately, a permit was issued to the new Kingsport Pavilion shopping center for grading, earthwork and site preparation.

 

The work was estimated at $10,000,000.  The permit fee was $20,000.

 

The shopping center will be located at 2626 East Stone Drive beside Lowe’s.

 

1.1 miles – Wellmont Corporate Offices

1.3 miles – East Stone Commons

1.8 miles – Indian Path Hospital

3.0 miles - Fort Henry Mall

3.4 miles – Holston Valley Hospital

3.7 miles – Wal-Mart (Fort Henry)

4.4 miles – Eastman Chemical Company

4.9 miles – Downtown Kingsport

5.6 miles – Colonial Heights

6.3 miles – Wal-Mart (W Stone)

6.3 miles – MeadowView Convention Center

7.2 miles – Ridgefields/Rotherwood/Allandale

7.9 miles – Indian Springs/Fall Creek

8.4 miles – U.S. 11W/SR 394 intersection

8.6 miles – Sullivan Gardens

9.2 miles – Rock Springs

9.9 miles – Mount Carmel

10.5 miles - Gate City/Weber City, VA

12.4 miles – Blountville

13.3 miles – Fall Branch

13.4 miles – Church Hill

14.6 miles – Bristol Regional Medical Center

15.8 miles – Gray

17.6 miles – Bristol Motor Speedway

19.0 miles – Downtown Bristol

22.5 miles – Surgoinsville

24.9 miles – Nickelsville, VA

29.7 miles – Duffield, VA

32.2 miles – Baileyton

32.5 miles - Rogersville

43.8 miles – Big Stone Gap, VA

48.9 miles – Jonesville/Pennington Gap, VA

51.0 miles – Norton/Wise, VA

69.6 miles – Harlan, KY

72.6 miles – Jenkins, KY

 

 

I want to say a special thanks to our new city engineer, Hank Clabaugh, as well as Andrew Tolley of the Tennessee Department of Environment & Conservation for their professional and timely review of the various environmental and stormwater permits. 

 

Based on what I’ve seen thus far, this project could be a role model.  The double-row silt fencing installed the creekbank is exemplary.  The developer’s approach to the step-by-step instructions on TDEC’s website made for a smooth process of plans submittal and review.

 

Thanks for your hard work,

Jeff

 

Tilden J. Fleming, AICP

Assistant City Manager for Development

City of Kingsport, Tennessee

423-229-9381 (desk/cell)

fleming@ci.kingsport.tn.us

 

 

Thursday, October 26, 2006

Change Your Clocks, Change Your Batteries

 

For the end of Fire Prevention Month, the Kingsport Fire Department would like to remind you, “Change Your Clock, Change Your Batteries!”

 

The end of daylight savings time is October 29th, and as a safety reminder the Kingsport Fire Department suggests that you change the batteries in you smoke detectors.

 

Smoke Detectors should be tested monthly. If your smoke detectors are not working, replace the batteries or the entire unit. Kingsport Fire Marshal Robert Sluss stated, “If your smoke detectors are over 10 years old they may have lost their ability to properly detect smoke and they need to be replaced.”

 

Over the last year the Kingsport Fire Department in cooperation with Operation Fire Safe have distributed over 18,000 smoke detectors to families in our region.  The Kingsport Fire Department would like to thank the following Volunteer Fire Departments for their help distributing smoke detectors in their communities: Nickelsville VFD, Weber City VFD, Hiltons VFD, Dungannon VFD, Piney Flats VFD, Avoca VFD, Bloomingdale VFD, East Sullivan County VFD, Warriors Path VFD, Ft. Blackmore VFD and Sullivan West VFD.

 

For More Information Contact:

Barry Brickey, Public Education Officer, Kingsport Fire Department

423-229-9440 or barryjbrickey@gmail.com

 

The Following Fact Pages are from the National Fire Protection Association. www.nfpa.org

Make smoke alarms work for your safety 

  • Smoke alarm facts
  • Installation and maintenance tips
  • A life-saving test: check your smoke alarms regularly

Smoke alarms are the residential fire safety success story of the past quarter century. Smoke alarm technology has been around since the 1960s. But the single-station, battery-powered smoke alarm we know today became available to consumers in the 1970s, and since then, the home fire death rate has been reduced by half. Most states have laws requiring them in residential dwellings.

Important: Working smoke alarms are essential in every household. It is necessary to practice home fire drills to be certain everyone is familiar with the smoke alarm signal, and to determine if there are any obstacles to a quick and safe evacuation (including the inability for some to awaken to the smoke alarm signal).

Facts & figures

  • A 2004 U.S. telephone survey found that 96% of the households surveyed had at least one smoke alarm.
  • Roughly half of home fire deaths result from fires in the small percentage of homes with no smoke alarms.
  • Homes with smoke alarms (whether or not they are operational) typically have a death rate that is 40-50% less than the rate for homes without alarms.
  • In one-quarter of the reported fires in homes equipped with smoke alarms, the devices did not work. Households with non-working smoke alarms now outnumber those with no smoke alarms.
  • Why do smoke alarms fail? Most often because of missing, disconnected or dead batteries.

Source: NFPA's "U.S. Experience with Smoke Alarms and Other Fire Detection/Alarm Equipment."

Installation and maintenance tips

  • Install smoke alarms on every level of your home, including the basement, making sure that there is an alarm outside every separate sleeping area. New homes are required to have a smoke alarm in every sleeping room and all smoke alarms must be interconnected.
  • Hard-wired smoke alarms operate on your household electrical current. They can be interconnected so that every alarm sounds regardless of the fire's location. This is an advantage in early warning, because it gives occupants extra time to escape if they are in one part of the home and a fire breaks out in another part. Alarms that are hard-wired should have battery backups in case of a power outage, and should be installed by a qualified electrician.
  • If you sleep with bedroom doors closed, have a qualified electrician install interconnected smoke alarms in each room so that when one alarm sounds, they all sound.
  • If you, or someone in your home is deaf or hard of hearing, consider installing an alarm that combines flashing lights, vibration and/or sound.
  • Mount smoke alarms high on walls or ceilings (remember, smoke rises). Ceiling mounted alarms should be installed at least four inches away from the nearest wall; wall-mounted alarms should be installed four to 12 inches away from the ceiling.
  • If you have ceilings that are pitched, install the alarm near the ceiling's highest point.
  • Don't install smoke alarms near windows, doors, or ducts where drafts might interfere with their operation.
  • Never paint smoke alarms. Paint, stickers, or other decorations could keep the alarms from working.

A life-saving test: check your smoke alarms regularly

  • Test your smoke alarms once a month, following the manufacturer's instructions.
  • Replace the batteries in your smoke alarm once a year, or as soon as the alarm "chirps" warning that the battery is low. Hint: schedule battery replacements for the same day you change your clocks from daylight savings time to standard time in the fall.
  • Never "borrow" a battery from a smoke alarm. Smoke alarms can't warn you of fire if their batteries are missing or have been disconnected.
  • Don't disable smoke alarms even temporarily. If your smoke alarm is sounding "nuisance alarms," try relocating it farther from kitchens or bathrooms, where cooking fumes and steam can cause the alarm to sound.
  • Regularly vacuuming or dusting your smoke alarms, following the manufacturer's instructions, can keep them working properly.
  • Smoke alarms don't last forever. Replace yours once every 10 years. If you can't remember how old the alarm is, then it's probably time for a new one.
  • Consider installing smoke alarms with "long-life" (10-year) batteries.
  • Plan regular fire drills to ensure that everyone knows exactly what to do when the smoke alarm sounds. Hold a drill at night to make sure that sleeping family members awaken at the sound of the alarm. Some studies have shown that some children may not awaken to the sound of the smoke alarm. Know what your child will do before a fire occurs.
  • If you are building a new home or remodeling your existing home, consider installing an automatic home fire sprinkler system. Sprinklers and smoke alarms together cut your risk of dying in a home fire 82 percent relative to having neither – a savings of thousands of lives a year.

Sensing systems
Most smoke alarms use one of two common sensing systems for detecting a fire.

  • Ionization-type smoke alarms have a small amount of radioactive material between two electrically charged plates, which ionizes the air and causes current to flow between the plates. When smoke enters the chamber, it disrupts the flow of ions, thus reducing the flow of current and activating the alarm.
  • Photoelectric-type alarms aim a light source into a sensing chamber at an angle away from the sensor. Smoke enters the chamber, reflecting light onto the light sensor; triggering the alarm.

Ionization vs. photoelectric
Photoelectric alarms respond slightly faster to smoldering fires; ionization alarms respond slightly faster to flaming fires. Since, as a practical matter; you cannot predict the type of fire that will occur; the slight difference is irrelevant. Either type of alarm will detect nearly every type of fire quickly. Some manufacturers offer dual-chamber alarms that use both sensor systems.

NFPA does not test, label or approve any products.

NFPA's position statement on smoke alarms

NFPA is aware of the recent research indicating that sleeping children don't always awake when a smoke alarm activates. While these dramatic results are worrisome, we shouldn’t allow them to obscure the fact that smoke alarms are highly effective at reducing fire deaths and injuries.

NFPA would like to reaffirm the value of the smoke alarms already available to protect people from home fire deaths and voice our concern about the number of U.S. households without these early warning devices. Our research indicates that, while 95 percent of American homes have at least one smoke alarm, more than a third of these alarms are inoperable because of dead or missing batteries. Roughly 70% of home fire deaths result from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms.

We also want to emphasize the need to continue planning and practicing home fire escape plans and to make sure everyone in a home can be awakened by the sound of the smoke alarm. We continue to reinforce the importance of developing and practicing a home fire escape plan during which the smoke alarm is activated so all family members know its sound.

Every home fire escape plan is different, and every family should know who will – and who won't – awaken at the sound of the smoke alarm so that it can accommodate any special needs. Parents should make sure their smoke alarms can rouse their children, even from a deep sleep. If someone doesn't wake up when the alarm sounds during a drill, suggest installing additional hard-wired, interconnected alarms inside every bedroom. And if this doesn't work, the family should design an escape plan that assigns a grown-up who is easily awakened by the alarm to wake the sleepers, perhaps by yelling "FIRE," pounding on the wall or door, or blowing a whistle.

React quickly to the alarm, get out of the building as fast as possible, and stay out until the fire department says it's all right to return.

-NFPA 2006

 

Friday, October 20, 2006

Kingsport landmark gets a face lift & new name

KINGSPORT, Tenn.  The Ramada Inn on East Stone Drive in Kingsport has been a landmark in the city for more than 30 years.  It’s the home to nearly every civic group and community club in the area and now the hotel is getting a much needed face lift and a new name. 

 

The Ramada Inn in its early years was the hub of civic activity for the community and a place that thousands would meet for brunch on Sundays.  However, in the early 2000’s the hotel was not what many remembered and was actually close to demolition in July 2005 when Pinnacle Hospitality, Inc. bought the property. 

 

The company has spent some time cleaning it up and is now changing the name to Americourt Hotel and spending ½ million dollars on revamping the outside.  Pinnacle Hospitality, Inc. is in the process of a significant exterior enhancement including new paint, added columns in front of the rooms, a new metal roof line and a large courtyard space complete with a 30 foot fountain that will expand the conference space into the outside. 

 

“We want to be very involved in the community and make this hotel even better than what it once was,” said Michael Little, VP of Pinnacle Hospitality, Inc.  “We are already gaining back the community business and this hotel is again the place the community considers its home for civic groups.”

 

The hotel’s employees are also very dedicated.  The staff includes 450 years of experience and many employees who have been there since it opened. 

 

Prices are around $65 a night and the hotel has a 100% money back guarantee.  Rooms have been renovated within the last 5 years, along with the restaurant which serves lunch Monday-Friday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and Sunday brunch.  The hotel also features a free hot breakfast, free shuttle service, free high speed wireless internet and a bar for guests.  Americourt Hotel is the 3rd largest in the Tri-Cities for conference space with 10,000 square feet and is involved actively with the Kingsport Convention and Visitors Bureau (KCVB). 

 

The KCVB is a partnership between the Kingsport Area Chamber of Commerce and the city of Kingsport.  Its mission is “to market the city and provide services to meeting and convention planners, tour operators, and business and leisure travelers by serving as a tourist development program of the Kingsport Chamber in partnership with the city of Kingsport.”  For more KCVB news, visit www.kcvb.org.

 

 

Today at 10 a.m.

Location:  J. Fred Johnson Park on Fort Henry Drive between Eastman Road and Indian Court.

Miles Burdine will receive Bronze Star for service in Iraq

Published 2006-10-16 15:17:32

By Editor -

Miles Burdine, the executive vice president and CEO of the Kingsport Chamber of Commerce, and a colonel in the US Marine Corps Reserve, will receive the Bronze Star during a 10 a.m. Friday ceremony at the new Veteran's Memorial in Kingsport.

Burdine is receiving the medal for his service as a member of the 6th Civil Affairs Group during 2005-2006.

He was activated in 2005 and assumed duties as the commander of Detachment 1, 6th Civil Affairs group during his seven month deployment to AL Anbar Province.

 

Thursday, October 19, 2006

From Jacksonville to Kingsport...

-----Original Message-----
From: Jackie Hewitt [mailto:jhewitt@tcigroup.com]

Dear Jeff,

 

You might be interested to know that I forwarded this email information on to the new owners of the old Anderson Furniture Building, which they closed on yesterday.

 

Mr.& Mrs. Vicki & Gary Greenewalt are relocating to Kingsport from Jacksonville Florida as they wish to escape the crime.  So, a little while ago I asked them if they could tell me what it was they liked about the area and they said it could be put into a few words and those were….. “just the attitude of the people’’. As a relatively new implant myself , actually now in our seventh year, I completely understand and concur with this statement. However, could you please encourage your email list of folks to take the time to drop in and see Vicki & Gary, if they see them working in the building, only I know they would really appreciate the friendly welcome. 

  

Vicki & Gary’s current email address is FKABarbwire@aol.com

 

Wishing you a great day.

 

 

Tuesday, October 17, 2006

How important are small businesses and entrepreneurs?

For more information on starting a small business in Kingsport, contact Aundrea Wilcox at 423.392.8801 or awilcox@kosbe.org

 

Local Perspective on “Establishments With No Paid Employees” (i.e. “small business”)

  • In 2004, the Tri-Cities Combined MSA had 29,011 establishments and $1,115,790,000 in receipts (a 3.3% increase in establishments and 5.3% increase in receipts over 2003).
  • In 2004, the Kingsport-Bristol MSA had 17,773 establishments and $649,569,000 in receipts (a 2.2% increase in establishments and 4.5% increase in receipts over 2003).
  • In 2004, the Johnson City MSA had 11,238 establishments and $466,221,000 in receipts (a 5.1% increase in establishments and 6.6% increase in receipts over 2003).

Traditionally known for its large manufacturing base and major corporate employers, it might be surprising to note that Kingsport-Bristol MSA posted 6,500 more individual small businesses with nearly $200 million more in annual receipts than the Johnson City MSA.  Johnson City, on the other hand, grew its small business base and receipts at a faster rate from 2003-2004.

 

National Perspective:

Businesses With No Paid Employees Increase to 19.5 Million

     The image of a typical “mom and pop” business is getting a makeover, according to new data on these burgeoning enterprises released today by the U.S. Census Bureau. Yesterday’s notion of a family-run corner store is giving way to Internet-based auctions, nail salons and even motorcycle dealerships, according to Nonemployer Statistics: 2004 [PDF].

     The nation added nearly a million businesses with no paid employees between 2003 and 2004 to reach 19.5 million, a growth rate of 4.7 percent over a one-year period. Businesses without a payroll make up more than 70 percent of the nation’s 27 million-plus firms, with annual receipts over $887 billion.

     The report has data on 17 million individual proprietorships and on more than 1.3 million corporations and 1.2 million partnerships. Nonemployer firms may be run by one or more individuals, can range from home-based businesses to corner stores or construction contractors and are often part-time ventures with owners operating more than one business.

     Among the fastest-growing: building finishing contractors (22.5 percent), Internet service providers (18.7 percent), nail salons (14.7 percent), electronic shopping and mail-order houses -- including Internet-based consumer trade (12.7 percent), lessors of real estate (9.7 percent), formal wear and costume rental stores (8 percent) and motorcycle dealers (7.4 percent).

     Florida led the nation in the growth of these small businesses with a 7.6 percent increase between 2003 and 2004. Georgia climbed to second place with a 7.1 percent increase, while Nevada fell from first to third place with a 6.4 percent increase.

     The Census Bureau cautioned that the numbers released today may be understated because the hurricane-impacted areas of Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas were granted additional time by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to file 2004 tax returns.

     Other highlights:

  • Utah and Arizona had small business increases of 6.1 percent and 5.8 percent, respectively, to round out the top five states. Despite a slight drop in its rate of self-employed business people, Nevada led the nation in receipts with a gain of 12.9 percent (See Excel Table 1.)
  • Among the nation’s most populous counties, Los Angeles County, Calif., had 777,103 nonemployer businesses, with Cook County, Ill., second at 363,365. They were followed by Miami-Dade County, Fla., at 273,016.
  • In Miami-Dade, Fla., real estate businesses accounted for more than 21 percent of the $10.2 billion total receipts.
  • Other counties with increases in nonemployer business growth included Orange County, Fla. (11.2 percent); Clark County, Nev. (7.9 percent); San Bernardino County, Calif. (7.1 percent); Maricopa County, Ariz. (6.7 percent); Montgomery County, Md., (4.9 percent); and Fairfax County, Va. (4.7 percent). (See Excel Table 2.)

     The detailed Internet tables show the number of establishments in nearly 300 industries and their receipts for the nation, states, counties and metropolitan areas. The data do not cover all self-employed individuals, since many self-employed business owners have paid employees.

-X-

Nonemployer statistics data originate chiefly from administrative records of the IRS. The data are subject to nonsampling error such as errors of self-classification as well as errors of response, nonreporting and coverage. Further information about methodology and data limitations is available at <http://www.census.gov/epcd/nonemployer/view/covmeth.htm>

 

 

Friday, October 13, 2006

"Bringing it to Kingsport" Tennessee Physical Theraphy in Town This Weekend

National Physical Therapy Month brings PT’s from across the state to Kingsport

 

KINGSPORT, Tenn.The Tennessee Physical Therapy Association (TPTA) is “Bringing it to Kingsport” at MeadowView Marriott Conference Resort & Convention Center the weekend of October 13-15.

 

The Tri-Cities District of the TPTA is hosting this year’s fall event in Kingsport with the help of the Kingsport Convention and Visitors Bureau (KCVB).  This is considered the Fall State Meeting for all of Tennessee’s physical therapists and physical therapist assistants.  Alan Meade, Director of Rehab Services for Holston Medical Group, chairs the district and is the one who is credited for bringing this group to Kingsport

 

“This is a very exciting opportunity for our end of the state to host such a function.  We are calling the meeting:  Ladies and Gentlemen, Start your Engines for the Tri-Cities 500,”  Meade said.   “We are using a racing theme in order get people here to this community so they can achieve some of their required continuing education credits.”

 

The program committee led by Scott Reynolds, PT, ATC, Carol Wheelock PT, MBA from Wellmont and Alan Meade promises a tremendous qualifying round of dynamic speakers/presenters who will bring a wealth of knowledge in physical therapy topics and health care related issues. 

 

Entertainment includes a Friday night reception to meet local legislators David Davis and Jason Mumpower, rehab vendors and to review student poster presentations.  Saturday night, the group will be entertained in an elaborate style at the Bristol Motor Speedway. 

 

The KCVB is very proud to host such an event during the month of October which is recognized as “National Physical Therapy Month” by the American PT Association. 

 

The Kingsport Convention and Visitors Bureau (KCVB) is a partnership between the Kingsport Area Chamber of Commerce and the city of Kingsport.  Its mission is “to market the city and provide services to meeting and convention planners, tour operators, athletic event planners and business and leisure travelers by serving as a tourist development program of the Kingsport Chamber in partnership with the city of Kingsport.”  For more KCVB news, visit www.kcvb.org

 

 

 

Thursday, October 12, 2006

Dobyns-Bennett Band named Greeneville Grand Champion

Click here è Greeneville Band Classic Draws Crowd Of Thousands
Greeneville Sun - Greeneville,TN,USA
Dobyns-Bennett High School’s band was chosen “grand champion” Saturday at the third annual Greeneville Band Classic at Tusculum College. ...

Note: article also includes award recognitions for Sullivan Central, Sullivan North, Sullivan East, Elizabethton, Hampton, Cloudland

 

Wednesday, October 11, 2006

Journey to Work? Most Tri-Cities residents stay close to home

The “daily commute” is certainly not isolated to the Tri-Cities region.

 

According to the U.S. Census, 7,200 workers leave Washington County, TN every day in order to spend their work day in Sullivan County, TN.  And every day, a different 7,200 workers leave Sullivan County, TN to work in Washington County, TN.

 

I guess they must pass each other on I-26 or U.S. 11E en route to work.  What if everyone just lived where they worked?  Wouldn’t that make more sense?

 

Well, statistics show that the majority of Tri-Cities residents do choose to live close to their workplace.

 

48,100 Sullivan County, TN residents (72%) live and work in their home county.

37,400 Washington County, TN residents (74%) live and work in their home county.

24,122 Greene County, TN residents (85%) live and work in their home county.

13,844 Washington County, VA residents (59%) live and work in their home county.

11,434 Hawkins County, TN residents (52%) live and work in their home county.

10,899 Carter County, TN residents (44%) live and work in their home county.

 

A few people drive 2 counties away for work.

 

741 Hawkins County, TN residents commute to Washington County, TN

379 Unicoi County, TN residents commute to Sullivan County, TN

346 Hancock County, TN residents commute to Hamblen County, TN

266 Lee County, VA residents commute to Sullivan County, TN

260 Wise County, VA residents commute to Sullivan County, TN

238 Washington County, TN residents work in Washington County, VA

168 Johnson County, TN residents commute to Washington County, TN

 

Who is the most “self-contained” county in the Tri-Cities?  Greene County, TN, where 85% of the population both lives and works in Greene County.

 

Who sends the most residents to another county to work?  Scott County, VA, where 40% of the population works in Sullivan County, TN. 

 

 

County-by-County Breakdown:

 

72% of Sullivan County, TN residents also work in Sullivan County, TN

11% of Sullivan County, TN residents work in Washington County, TN

6% of Sullivan County, TN residents work in Bristol City, VA

4% of Sullivan County, TN residents work in Washington County, VA

2% of Sullivan County, TN residents work in Hawkins County, TN

 

74% of Washington County, TN residents also work in Washington County, TN

14% of Washington County, TN residents work in Sullivan County, TN

4% of Washington County, TN residents work in Greene County, TN

2% of Washington County, TN residents work in Carter County, TN

2% of Washington County, TN residents work in Unicoi County, TN

 

85% of Greene County, TN residents also work in Greene County, TN

4% of Greene County, TN residents work in Washington County, TN

3% of Greene County, TN residents work in Hamblen County, TN

3% of Greene County, TN residents work in Sullivan County, TN

1% of Greene County, TN residents work in Hawkins County, TN

 

59% of Washington County, VA residents also work in Washington County, VA

15% of Washington County, VA residents work in Bristol City, VA

11% of Washington County, VA residents work in Sullivan County, TN

7% of Washington County, VA residents work in Smyth County, VA

2% of Washington County, VA residents work in Russell County, VA

 

46% of Bristol City, VA residents also work in Bristol City, VA

29% of Bristol City, VA residents work in Sullivan County, TN

17% of Bristol City, VA residents work in Washington County, VA

3% of Bristol City, VA residents work in Washington County, TN

1% of Bristol City, VA Residents work in Carter County, TN

 

44% of Carter County, TN residents also work in Carter County, TN

39% of Carter County, TN residents work in Washington County, TN

7% of Carter County, TN residents work in Sullivan County, TN

4% of Carter County, TN residents work in Avery County, NC

2% of Carter County, TN residents work in Unicoi County, TN

 

59% of Hancock County, TN residents also work in Hancock County, TN

14% of Hancock County, TN residents work in Hamblen County, TN

9% of Hancock County, TN residents work in Claiborne County, TN

7% of Hancock County, TN residents work in Grainger County, TN

5% of Hancock County, TN residents work in Hawkins County, TN

 

52% of Hawkins County, TN residents also work in Hawkins County, TN

27% of Hawkins County, TN residents work in Sullivan County, TN

9% of Hawkins County, TN residents work in Hamblen County, TN

3% of Hawkins County, TN residents work in Washington County, TN

3% of Hawkins County, TN residents work in Greene County, TN

 

64% of Johnson County, TN residents also work in Johnson County, TN

15% of Johnson County, TN residents work in Watauga County, NC

4% of Johnson County, TN residents work in Caldwell County, NC

3% of Johnson County, TN residents work in Carter County, TN

3% of Johnson County, TN residents work in Washington County, VA

3% of Johnson County, TN residents work in Washington County, TN

 

62% of Lee County, VA residents also work in Lee County, VA

13% of Lee County, VA residents work in Wise County, TN

5% of Lee County, VA residents work in Claiborne County, TN

5% of Lee County, VA residents work in Bell County, KY

3% of Lee County, VA residents work in Scott County, VA

3% of Lee County, VA residents work in Sullivan County, TN

 

59% of Norton City, VA residents also work in Norton City, VA

31% of Norton City, VA residents work in Wise County, VA

3% of Norton City, VA residents work in Sullivan County, TN

2% of Norton City, VA residents work in Scott County, VA

2% of Norton City, VA residents work in Lee County, VA

 

60% of Russell County, VA residents also work in Russell County, VA

10% of Russell County, VA residents work in Washington County, VA

8% of Russell County, VA residents work in Tazewell County, VA

6% of Russell County, VA residents work in Wise County, VA

4% of Russell County, VA residents work in Bristol City, VA

 

40% of Scott County, VA residents work in Sullivan County, TN

40% of Scott County, VA residents also work in Scott County, VA

4% of Scott County, VA residents work in Washington County, TN

4% of Scott County, VA residents work in Wise County, VA

3% of Scott County, VA residents work in Hawkins County, TN

 

51% of Unicoi County, TN residents also work in Unicoi County, TN

31% of Unicoi County, TN residents work in Washington County, TN

5% of Unicoi County, TN residents work in Sullivan County, TN

3% of Unicoi County, TN residents work in Carter County, TN

 

62% of Wise County, VA residents also work in Wise County, VA

22% of Wise County, VA residents work in Norton City, VA

3% of Wise County, VA residents work in Russell County, VA

2% of Wise County, VA residents work in Dickenson County, VA

2% of Wise County, VA residents work in Scott County, VA

2% of Wise County, VA residents work in Lee County, VA

2% of Wise County VA residents work in Sullivan County, TN

 

 

Kingsport is located on the Tennessee-Virginia border at the crossroads of I-81 and I-26 near the geographic center of the Eastern U.S. This city of 50,000 in a metro of 308,000, was planned by renowned American planner John Nolen in his office at Harvard Square. Located in the lush green foothills of the Tennessee Valley, it is surrounded by the Southern Highlands and mountain lakes. Kingsport is home to Marriott’s www.MeadowViewResort.com and thousands of acres of unique, natural amenities at Bays Mountain and Warriors Path Parks. The natural geography provides a temperate, well-balanced climate with four seasons and a natural shelter from extreme weather. Population growth has also been well-balanced, ensuring you will not outgrow your decision to relocate. With no personal property taxes, special assessments, or state income taxes on salaries/wages, you’ll find that Kingsport has a very low cost of living coupled with an exceptionally high quality of life (see for yourself at www.BestPlaces.net). The regional airport (TRI) has direct flights to Atlanta, Charlotte, Orlando and St. Pete/Clearwater with easy access, parking, and virtually no security lines. The public education system was planned by Columbia University and Newsweek has repeatedly recognized the local high school as one of the best in America. Year in and year out our graduates go on to the top colleges and universities (and without costly private school tuition fees). Harvard also recognized Kingsport in 2009 with the Innovations in American Government Award for its higher education initiative. What are you waiting for? It’s time to leave the high costs, traffic jams, and stress behind and discover this hidden gem.