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Wednesday, February 28, 2007

Tennessee Sales Tax Holiday - April 27-29

-----Original Message-----
 Subject: Message from Tennessee Department of Revenue

 

 

Sales Tax Holiday Coming April 27-29

 

This year consumers in Tennessee will be able to make tax-free purchases during two periods: during a special one-time sales tax holiday April 27-29, 2007, and during the annual sales tax holiday Aug. 3-5, 2007.

 

Both three-day holidays include the same tax-exempt items.

 

Details about the 2007 holidays are available on this dedicated page on Revenue's Web site: www.tntaxholiday.com.

 

For more information:

E-mail salestax.holiday@state.tn.us or call (800) 342-1003 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. CST.

 

NOTE:

Special Telephone Hours During the April Holiday:

Saturday, April 28, 2007 - 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. CST

Sunday, April 29, 2007 - 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. CST

 

 

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Community e-news sponsored by Charter High Speed Internet www.charter.com

 

To subscribe or unsubscribe, write to jeff_fleming@earthlink.net

 

For archival posts, use search feature at www.jefffleming.blogspot.com

 

www.MoveToKingsport.com

 

Links:

*Downtown Kingsport www.downtownkingsport.org

*City of Kingsport www.kingsportdevelopmentservices.com

*Small Business www.kingsportchamber.org/kedp/sbSmBusSuprt.htm

*Kingsport-Bristol-Sullivan County www.networkstn.com

*Tri-Cities Region www.tricitiesedalliance.com

*State of Tennessee www.state.tn.us/ecd

*Tri-Cities Regional Airport, Air Cargo & Foreign Trade Zone www.triflight.com

 

 

 

Holding Water - Kingsport & Tennessee are blessed with 'liquid gold'

Have you ever thought about water and how important it is to our everyday existence?

 

I mean have you really thought about it.

 

We already know that water is the most precious resource in the western states.  An old Western saying holds that “whiskey is for drinking and water is for fighting over.”

 

While attending a national planning conference in San Antonio last April, I learned that it hadn’t rained in months.  This was at a time when I really needed to mow my own yard twice a week just to keep up with the lush green growth in East Tennessee (although I didn’t always get around to it).

 

While we were in Denver last summer on vacation, my children heard public announcements about which side of the street could water their lawns on which days.  Residents were offered stern warnings that “penalties will be enforced”.  We were told of residents who were fined for having their “lawns too green” – a sure sign of water abuse.  My children were stunned.  They, like many of us in this part of the country, don’t appreciate what we have.  They had never been exposed to a place where water doesn’t fall from the sky in even intervals that produce green lawns and dense forests.  It was an eye-opening experience for them.

 

Water shortages aren’t limited to the West.  As growth and development occurs in the Southeast, squabbles and legal battles are abounding in Virginia, North Carolina, Georgia, Florida and Alabama.  For example, the Atlanta metro area is consuming so much water from the Chattahoochee that the $70 million gulf oyster industry in Florida is being jeopardized.

 

Tennessee’s liquid assets are the envy of most states.

 

Kingsport, specifically, has millions of gallons of excess water plant capacity (nearly 50% excess if memory serves).  This is an asset that is virtually unheard of – even in Tennessee.

 

Yet another reason to move to Kingsport, www.movetokingsport.com

 

 

-----Original Message-----
Holding Water

 

By Katie Porterfield

Business Tennessee

February 2007

 

Water, water everywhere. One glance at the state map and it’s apparent that Tennessee is blessed with blue gold. Fundamental to industry, agriculture, transportation, energy production and tourism, not to mention personal use, Tennessee’s water sources are as ample as they are vital to its economic development.

 

The state boasts more than 60,000 miles of rivers and streams and almost 538,000 acres of lakes and reservoirs. It benefits from the Tennessee River—the nation’s fifth largest river system—which crosses the state not once, but twice, in its 652-mile trek to the Ohio River. Formed at the junction of the Holston and French Broad rivers above Knoxville, the Tennessee flows southwest to Chattanooga, into Alabama and Mississippi, and back into Tennessee’s Hardin County before ending up in Kentucky. This mighty waterway isn’t the only significant blue area on the map. There’s also the Cumberland River, which enters the state from southeastern Kentucky, makes a loop in northern Tennessee and then flows back into Kentucky before also draining into the Ohio River. Through the years, these two major arteries and their tributaries, along with a statewide average of more than 50 inches of rain a year and plentiful groundwater resources in the western part of the state, have granted Tennessee a relatively worry-free existence when it comes to H20. This abundance—and the absence of water-fueled conflicts as a result—is a luxury most Western states can only envy. Western water conflicts are the stuff movies are made of, literally—the 1974 film Chinatown drew much of its intrigue from The California Water Wars, in which a booming Los Angeles underhandedly purchased thousands of acres in Owens Valley to construct a 233-mile aqueduct that pumped water south. The notorious water grab, along with subsequent moves, robbed valley residents of the water they thought would irrigate their farmland and made a desert of the once fertile valley. Since then, population in the arid western United States has soared, increasing tension over already sparse water supplies and leading to courtroom battles over the rights, use and distribution of various water sources.

 

The Southeast Oasis?

 

Meanwhile, for years, the South, with its meandering rivers and generous rainfall, seemed immune to such water shortages, and in turn, to the conflicts that arise from them. Over the last few decades, however, the region has experienced hotter summers, mild winters and below average rainfall. Such conditions, coupled with explosive population growth, have caused experts to question whether the region’s water supply can support future demand for water’s competing uses. Already, conflicts—not necessarily the inspiration for box office hits, but at times just as bitter as those out West—have erupted in places where water was never expected to be an issue. In the 1980s, for example, Virginia and North Carolina began sparring over Virginia’s plans to divert water from Lake Gaston on the Roanoke River, which begins in Virginia and flows into North Carolina, to supply the growing coastal city of Virginia Beach. After 15 years of failed negotiation attempts and a number of lawsuits, North Carolina failed to prove that the diversion would harm the state, and Roanoke River water began flowing to Virginia Beach through a 76-mile pipeline in 1998.

 

Virginia and North Carolina are not the only Tennessee border states wrestling with water. Georgia and Alabama, along with Florida, are in the midst of a yet-to-be-resolved 17-year-old dispute regarding allocation formulas for water in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) and the Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa (ACT) river basins. It all began in 1990, when an Atlanta request that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reallocate water in several North Georgia reservoirs to support its burgeoning population growth sparked lawsuits by downstream users. Alabama argued that Atlanta’s request threatened its own water supply, potentially stunting future growth and resulting in degraded water quality due to a drop-off in water flow. Florida’s concern was more focused—keeping enough water flowing into Apalachicola Bay to support its $70 million oyster industry.

 

Lawsuits were suspended to allow a comprehensive study on water demand, availability and management for the two river basins. In 1997, the three states formed two congressionally sanctioned compacts, the ACF compact and the ACT compact, to determine allocation policies for apportioning the water. Since then, agreement deadlines have been extended multiple times, parties have broken off talks, and through it all, the three states have spent millions of dollars on legal and consulting fees. The latest deadline, set by a federal judge in Alabama, was January 31. If the three states can’t ultimately reach an agreement, the Supreme Court will likely decide water allocation.

 

These two conflicts, unprecedented in the East just a few decades ago, serve clear notice: the water wars are here. As population growth and urban sprawl continue throughout the southeastern states, water policy experts anticipate such skirmishes—both interstate and intrastate—will only increase. “Water wars in the Southeast show us that whether you’re living in an environment with lots of water or an arid one, the era of easy water is over,” says Aaron Wolf, water policy specialist in the department of geosciences at Oregon University.

 

Resource Drains

 

The role of water-rich Tennessee, whose liquid assets are still the envy of many states, has not merely been that of spectator. In February 2005, Mississippi filed suit against Memphis alleging that the city’s publicly owned municipal utility is pumping water from the Memphis Sand Aquifer at such a rate that it’s drawing water northward from the area under Mississippi, damaging the aquifer and robbing Mississippi of a valuable underground water source. (Litigation is still in the discovery stage.) And while the Volunteer State’s water resources may compare favorably to its peers, within its borders, abundant water is not a given. Particularly in areas experiencing rapid population growth and increased economic activity—and Tennessee has quite a few such areas—local governments face the challenge of maintaining an adequate water supply to sustain existing activities and enable future growth.

 

While large cities like Nashville, Knoxville and Chattanooga, benefit from their proximity to the Cumberland and Tennessee rivers, it’s cities in headwater areas—small streams where rivers begin—that face water supply challenges as people continue to move there and development follows. “For rural areas in high elevations, water becomes more of an issue,” says Bill Barron, the hydrology and hydraulics branch chief for the Nashville District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. “The closer you are to a river, the better off you are, and it gets harder the higher up and farther away you get.” In a 2004 water supply inventory and needs analysis report, TVA, which manages the Tennessee River for the seven-state Tennessee Valley region, identified 13 Tennessee cities and four counties that are already experiencing water woes or are expected to encounter them in the future. “There are communities in areas not served by reservoirs that have problems with water supply under low stream flow, or dry, conditions,” says Chuck Bohac, TVA water supply specialist and co-author of the report. “Some of them have already experienced water supply differentials and have run out of water at certain times, and others, given projected growth, are expected to exceed present supply.”

 

In Bledsoe County, for example, three of the county’s four wells went dry during the 2000 drought, forcing water to be trucked in, schools to close and businesses to cut back hours. In the Smoky Mountains, where cities like Gatlinburg and Sevierville are experiencing extensive residential and commercial growth, demand is expected to exceed supply. And in Cumberland County, a growing retirement locale and tourist destination, officials realized in the late 1990s that population was destined to outstrip supply. Since then, they’ve been working with the U.S. Corps of Engineers to find alternative water sources.

 

Susan Hutson, a U.S. Geological Survey hydrologist at the University of Memphis Ground Water Institute, says other hotspots (not mentioned in the TVA report) in which demand is expected to exceed supply include counties in the Duck River watershed, such as Coffee, Bedford Marshall, Maury and southern Williamson. “We’ve done studies looking at water availability and demand in these areas, and the conclusion is there is adequate water in the river to support needs through 2025,” Huston says. “The Duck River is the most biodiverse inland river in the United States, so there is active concern for preserving that biodiversity and at the same time having enough water to support economic development.”

 

In fact, the need to balance environmental protection with municipal, industrial, agricultural and recreational water demands is becoming even more critical to water management efforts. Many experts believe conflicts between such competing uses pose the greatest threat to water supply in Tennessee and throughout the Southeast—especially as the region continues to grow. In the Tennessee River watershed alone, TVA and U.S. Geological survey projections predict an increase in population from about 4.5 million to about 5.9 million residents by the year 2030.

 

All things considered, Tennessee remains in an enviable position. While the Tennessee River is the most intensely used river in the country, consumptive use (water not returned to the system) on the main stem of the river remains low. Though border skirmishes aren’t unheard of, thus far they lack the dire consequences felt out West. And though water shortages for any number of burgeoning Tennessee communities are an inevitable consequence of growth and weather, we’ve as yet avoided crises of a magnitude demanding desperate measures. Nonetheless, as users strive for larger gulps from the same trough, water policy experts say it’s important, not only to beef up conservation efforts, but also to work together as a state and region to manage and allocate water resources. It boils down to better cooperation and ultimately, enlightened stewardship that favors consensus over litigation-fueled mandates.

 

Hands Across Fiefdoms

 

From an economic development perspective, cooperation just makes sense. “If you have an area of four or five counties that pool their resources and try to have strategic plans for maximizing assets, you’re going to recruit industry better than four or five that have cut-throat competition with each other,” says Wilton Burnett, special projects director in the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development.

 

That kind of thinking extends to water. “It’s economies of scale,” says David Feldman, a University of Tennessee professor and political science department head who advises the state on water issues. “If community X and its neighboring community Y are growing, how can they work together and develop a common water supply, so they don’t have to compete with one another?”

 

Cumberland County Mayor Brock Hill, who has been coping with water supply challenges in Cumberland County for about 10 years, agrees, saying it’s wise to plan with other counties on the Cumberland Plateau. “They will be experiencing in the future what we’re experiencing now,” he says. “You should not have to do it over and over again every time a county needs more water. With more people involved in the process, the potential is greater to have the right solution, and cost per customer will not be as a great.”

 

Feldman says consolidation of, or even just better cooperation between, utility districts can go a long way toward solving water woes. Consolidation prevents infrastructure duplication and spreads fixed capital, operation and maintenance costs over a larger population base, which provides communities with more reliable supply options and lowers customer costs.

 

In rural areas that have multiple districts, however, such cooperation can be easier said than done. “Many of our utility districts said they wanted to work together, but when it came down to it, self-interest kicked in,” Hill says. “They were almost like little fiefdoms.”

 

Avoiding the Bar, and the Czar

 

Given that rivers transcend state borders, working together within the state is only a starting point. Unfortunately, the trend toward settling water issues in the courtroom will likely get worse before it gets better. “I think we’ll fight a little bit,” Feldman says. “When it comes to water, we don’t quite get it yet. In the western U.S., they would rather not go to court. They’d rather work things out in other ways, but it took generations to get there.” It’s important, however, that Tennessee “gets it.” After all, we only have to look south at Alabama, Georgia and Florida’s protracted squabble for an example of how costly and inconvenient such conflicts can be. “We have to come together with our neighbors and make good agreements in terms of sharing resources,” says Randy Gentry, water resources professor in the University of Tennessee’s civil and environmental engineering department and director of the Southeastern Water Resources Institute. “If we continue down the road we’re heading, conflict resolution will be played out in the courts. It could be an unfriendly scenario for business and municipalities in which planning could be taken out of our hands and be put into the hands of some kind of federal water czar or manager. We need to keep decision-making in our own hands.”

 

A first step, according to Gentry, might be for governors throughout the region to appoint members to a commission that would come up with a set of recommendations for regional water management. “That set of recommendations would be passed from governors to the federal electorate, saying ‘These are the tools we need to manage water on a regional basis, and we need to implement these tools,’” Gentry explains. “When another governor takes office, he will have to obey the rules and guidelines set down by the water commission.”

 

An old Western saying holds that “whiskey is for drinking and water is for fighting over.” Though originally a reference to California in the late 1800s, the adage could well gain new meaning east of the Mississippi. But it shouldn’t. Now, while the water is comparatively plentiful and litigation minimal, the state can be proactive in developing regional strategies for sharing water resources and improving water quality. The time to act is now, before resource-sharing issues grow and become contentious. To add a twist to another old familiar phrase—a drop of prevention is worth a gallon of cure.

 

 

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Community e-news sponsored by Charter High Speed Internet www.charter.com

 

To subscribe or unsubscribe, write to jeff_fleming@earthlink.net

 

For archival posts, use search feature at www.jefffleming.blogspot.com

 

www.MoveToKingsport.com

 

Links:

*Downtown Kingsport www.downtownkingsport.org

*City of Kingsport www.kingsportdevelopmentservices.com

*Small Business www.kingsportchamber.org/kedp/sbSmBusSuprt.htm

*Kingsport-Bristol-Sullivan County www.networkstn.com

*Tri-Cities Region www.tricitiesedalliance.com

*State of Tennessee www.state.tn.us/ecd

*Tri-Cities Regional Airport, Air Cargo & Foreign Trade Zone www.triflight.com

 

 

 

Saturday, February 24, 2007

10 Hot Jobs for 2007 from www.fastcompany.com

As a planner and blogger I couldn’t pass this one up!  (See below). - Jeff

 

10 Hot Jobs for 2007

What are the hottest jobs for 2007? Fast Company spoke with trend experts to compile a list of the top 10 professions that will be in high demand in 2007.

From: FastCompany.com | January 2007 | By: Kathryn Tuggle

Fast Company's Top Jobs list for 2007 takes a look at 10 of the most sought-after positions in some of the fastest growing U.S. industries.

This year, we followed in the footsteps of the creative and indomitable Fast Company reader. Our readers don't wait for the Department of Labor to tell them what fields are hot -- they start their own trends, and develop their own businesses and jobs.

In the spirit of blazing one's own trail, we spoke with trend forecasters to determine which careers will be the most popular in the coming year. Gerald Celente, Publisher of the Trends Journal, along with the team at TrendsResearch.com provided us with details on which industries are growing the fastest. Armed with statistics on industry competitiveness and job availability supplied by Monster.com, this year's list has been compiled with the forward-thinking attitude of the Fast Company reader and the professions listed.

Each job listing contains and explanation of the position, why it's hot for 2007, and suggestions for further topical reading from Fast Company articles from the past year. Some positions have a tech focus, some are design based, but they all share common ground: It takes a creative soul with an endless amount of determination and innovation to thrive in these fields. This year, Fast Company salutes its readers who brave the challenge of the "what if" with the list of top professions destined for success in 2007.

Experience Designer: These talented individuals work in the retail industry, creating the essence and aura of a store. Experience designers go beyond the look of a place, creating a unique experience in which shoppers can immerse themselves. From cellular boutiques to the American Girl doll store on New York's Fifth Avenue, the shops created by an experience designer are often considered works of art; mini universes unto themselves. Experience designers are involved in every aspect of creation -- from choosing accent colors on walls to slanting the windows in the right direction. The next time you go into a boutique and you feel as if you've just had an "experience" -- you have, and someone went to a lot of trouble to make you feel at home.
Further reading: "American Girl," Keith Hammonds, September 2006.

Medical Researcher: It's no news that what's on the forefront of medicine is on the forefront of America's collective mind. Researchers of cancer, Alzheimers, and the developers of prosthetics are the most coveted titles in the healthcare industry. With the aging baby boomer population, the need for cures and treatment plans is both paramount and profitable. Major developments aren’t only taking place in medicine, but also in the way doctors file medical records. Individuals with the know-how and creative juice to mix tech with medicine can expect seven figure salaries in the year ahead.
Further
Reading: "Top Scalpel," Michael Prospero, April 2006 and "Record Time," Charles Fishman, April 2006.

Web Designer: What's new about web designers? We already know they have cool jobs, working as the creative arm behind highly trafficked websites. But Trendsresearch.com reports that the profession is still in its adolescent phase, and for 2007 it's going to be a new era of web design. Monster.com charts a 26 percent growth rate in this field for the past year, which will continue to blossom for the coming year.
Further
Reading: "Technology: Boom, Bust, and Beyond," Adam Penenberg, March 2006 and "The Jobs of Web 2.0," Angus Loten, September 2006.

Security Systems Engineer: Monster.com reports that individuals in the protective services industry can expect a rise in demand and salary for 2007. Advances in Vegas-Casino like security systems and satellite maps are helping to wire the world for defense. Individuals with a head for engineering and computers can easily expect a six-figure salary in this industry. From sonar imaging to keystroke identification, keeping our country and our world safer has never been easier or more profitable.
Further
Reading: We Got the Beat," Joseph Manez, September 2006.

Urban Planners: From the Hong Kong International Airport Residential Tower to suburban "McMansion" sprawl, individuals in residential planning and development can expect a lot of work in the coming year. Urban Planners must meet the demand for real estate that's both decadent and practical. Prefab one-level homes engineered for the aging baby boomer population are changing the face of suburban America, and boosting the demand for urban planners.
Further
Reading: "Rise of the Aerotropolis," Greg Lindsay, July/August 2006 and "House in a Box," John Rosenthal, November 2006.

Viral Marketers and Media Promoters: Not to be confused with someone in advertising or public relations, a viral marketer knows how to build an audience from nothing with little more than rumor and excitement. Known for such coups as MySpace's Lonelygirl15 and the Blair Witch Project, Viral Marketers begin "contagious" campaigns that spread largely through word of mouth. They now have a foothold in American advertising due largely to the Internet.
Further
Reading: "Down the Rabbit Hole," Danielle Sacks, November 2006.

Talent Agents: As Clint Eastwood would say, "These days, everyone is famous." And as fame and fortune grows for performers and athletes, a new arena opens for their managers, promoters, and general go-to guys. Although these titles may speak for themselves, duties for those fortunate enough to get close to the stars often include things like latte retrieval and limo reservations. Yet, next to the celebrities themselves, these positions are some of the most competitive in the entertainment industry.
Further
Reading: "Nothing But Net," Noah Shachtman, June 2006.

Buyers and purchasing agents: Trend forecasters predict that 2007 could be a make-or-break year for the retail industry, specifically the department store. Much of the department store's fate, says Gerald Celente, publisher of the Trends Journal, lies in the hands of the buyers and purchasing agents. These individuals are in charge of store inventory and make decisions on item color, size, quantity, and country of origin. With the recent vicissitudes of the retail industry, these jobs are often hard to come by and can be very lucrative if store profitability increases.
Further
Reading: "The Gucci Killer," Linda Tischler, January/February 2006.

Art Directors: From Broadway to movie sets, any job that involves paint, lights, cameras, and action is in demand, especially within the 20-30 demographic. Now perceived as the ultimate career for inspired artists with an affinity for pop culture, art directors, set directors, and stage production directors clamor for the top positions that call for hands-on creative genius with a couture designer's eye.
Further
Reading: "Telly Visionary," Linda Tischler, November 2006.

News Analysts, Reporters, and Bloggers: The Internet has created a new realm for reporters and writers, who previously only saw their names and ideas in print. Now, publications with an online division often hire three levels of correspondents: Print news writers, online news writers, and bloggers. Although most personal blogs aren't profitable enough to stand alone as businesses, writers can use their increasing popularity as another gateway for their voices to be heard.
Further
Reading: "How to Launch a Career With Your Blog," Leslie Taylor, October 2006.

 

Friday, February 23, 2007

Our Town

Jeff—

The Kingsport Theatre Guild is performing the classic Our Town March 9, 10 and 11. As part of this production, Jeff Jensen, the City Archivist is putting together a small display on early Kingsport and I would like quotes from 15-25 Kingsport natives to add to the display. “Quotes” can be up to three or four paragraphs and should be about what it was like to live in the “earlier days” of Kingsport—growing up here, raising a family, first job, etc. I need the quote, author’s name and how long she/she has lived here. I know bazillians of people read your blog, so if you could help spread the word about this project, I would really appreciate it. I need them by March 1 and they can be e-mailed to: ktg@charter.net.

 

Thanks!!!

 

Katherine Scoggins

 

 

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Community e-news sponsored by Charter High Speed Internet www.charter.com

 

To subscribe or unsubscribe, write to jeff_fleming@earthlink.net

 

For archival posts, use search feature at www.jefffleming.blogspot.com

 

www.MoveToKingsport.com

 

Links:

*Downtown Kingsport www.downtownkingsport.org

*City of Kingsport www.kingsportdevelopmentservices.com

*Small Business www.kingsportchamber.org/kedp/sbSmBusSuprt.htm

*Kingsport-Bristol-Sullivan County www.networkstn.com

*Tri-Cities Region www.tricitiesedalliance.com

*State of Tennessee www.state.tn.us/ecd

*Tri-Cities Regional Airport, Air Cargo & Foreign Trade Zone www.triflight.com

 

 

 

Thursday, February 22, 2007

Please vote for our region's own Dr. Richard Salluzzo

Vote here for Dr. Richard Salluzzo => https://websurveyor.net/wsb.dll/17673/200750mostdocsballot.htm

 

Please forward to friends and colleagues!

 

 

Hey Jeff.

We’ve received word that Dr. Salluzzo is one of 100 finalists for Modern Physician’s “50 Most Powerful Physician Executives” in the nation. The winners are decided by a public voting process. This would be a real honor — not only for Dr. Salluzzo and Wellmont but also for our region.  Would you consider sending out a mention to encourage everyone to vote? Voting continues through March 2.

Thanks, as always!

Amy Stevens
System Director of Communications and Public Relations
Wellmont Health System
(423) 230-8235
(423) 578-5951 (pager)

Each year, Modern Physician and Modern Healthcare magazines compile a ranking of the nation’s 50 most powerful physician executives.
 
Dr. Richard Salluzzo, Wellmont Health System’s president and chief executive officer and a double-board-certified physician, has been named one of 100 finalists for this prestigious honor.
 
Since taking the helm of the Wellmont system in 2004, Dr. Salluzzo has overseen a $25 million financial turnaround and directed myriad operational improvements that have resulted in dramatically improved performance throughout Wellmont’s member hospitals. Perhaps most significantly, Dr. Salluzzo is leading Wellmont’s revolutionary initiative to become the safest health system in
America.
 
The 50 physician executives who will be honored by Modern Physician and Modern Healthcare are selected by a public voting process. Please consider showing your support for Dr. Salluzzo’s leadership by casting a vote for him at www.modernphysician.com by clicking the following link: http://www.modernphysician.com/page.cms?pageId=276 Voting will continue through March 2.
 
Thank you.

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Community e-news sponsored by Charter High Speed Internet www.charter.com

 

To subscribe or unsubscribe, write to jeff_fleming@earthlink.net

 

For archival posts, use search feature at www.jefffleming.blogspot.com

 

www.MoveToKingsport.com

www.MoveToBristol.org

www.MoveToNortheastTN.com

 

Links:

*Downtown Kingsport www.downtownkingsport.org

*City of Kingsport www.kingsportdevelopmentservices.com

*Small Business www.kingsportchamber.org/kedp/sbSmBusSuprt.htm

*Kingsport-Bristol-Sullivan County www.networkstn.com

*Tri-Cities Region www.tricitiesedalliance.com

*State of Tennessee www.state.tn.us/ecd

*Tri-Cities Regional Airport, Air Cargo & Foreign Trade Zone www.triflight.com

 

 

 

Kingsport is located on the Tennessee-Virginia border at the crossroads of I-81 and I-26 near the geographic center of the Eastern U.S. This city of 50,000 in a metro of 308,000, was planned by renowned American planner John Nolen in his office at Harvard Square. Located in the lush green foothills of the Tennessee Valley, it is surrounded by the Southern Highlands and mountain lakes. Kingsport is home to Marriott’s www.MeadowViewResort.com and thousands of acres of unique, natural amenities at Bays Mountain and Warriors Path Parks. The natural geography provides a temperate, well-balanced climate with four seasons and a natural shelter from extreme weather. Population growth has also been well-balanced, ensuring you will not outgrow your decision to relocate. With no personal property taxes, special assessments, or state income taxes on salaries/wages, you’ll find that Kingsport has a very low cost of living coupled with an exceptionally high quality of life (see for yourself at www.BestPlaces.net). The regional airport (TRI) has direct flights to Atlanta, Charlotte, Orlando and St. Pete/Clearwater with easy access, parking, and virtually no security lines. The public education system was planned by Columbia University and Newsweek has repeatedly recognized the local high school as one of the best in America. Year in and year out our graduates go on to the top colleges and universities (and without costly private school tuition fees). Harvard also recognized Kingsport in 2009 with the Innovations in American Government Award for its higher education initiative. What are you waiting for? It’s time to leave the high costs, traffic jams, and stress behind and discover this hidden gem.